Pandemic Twins

As we all know having twins put you in the high risk category but what is like during a Global Pandemic. Shakira had her twins just when the rules changed to allow partners/family into the hospital for only 2 hours. Also due to Preeclampsia Shakira had to have a C-section and she shares how she coped and stayed positive.

Shakira can be found on Instagram @Shakira.Akabusi

Transcript
Georgia:

Welcome to the second season of the OSHA twins podcast. I'm your host or to Mitel today, we're going to be talking to Shakira. Chicago's a quantified pre and postnatal trainer. She has a platform called Mum discussing postnatal fitness tips. And she also had twins last year during the midst of the pandemic. So stay tuned. To hear all about her experience. Hi, she Kara, thank you again for agreeing to do the OSHA twins podcast. So today we're going to be discussing what it was like for you to have your twins during the pandemic. for those who might not know, or might not be from the UK we went through a period where birth and people were not allowed to have partners or, or birth in. Birth in friends, partners, anybody in the hospital with them until they hit a certain point in their labor active labor. which of would have caused a lot of stress trauma. You know, you need to get her back and people need support. So we're going to touch because she came up already has two tin or bullies. what was that like for you?

sharkia:

I love the name of shit twins, because literally they told me we weren't, we weren't even trying to conceive. And then it was like, wow, I'm pregnant. Oh gosh. Okay. Wow. This is a surprise. Let's go with that. And it was like, poof, it's twins. And I literally. Oh, my God, I, in that I was not most surprised I've ever been in my entire life in the best possible way, but my goodness, that was just such a surprise. as you said, the whole sort of pregnancy from then on, right at the beginning, when I found out I was pregnant. it was around Christmas time and everything was still relatively. Okay. And then it was that, that new year where everything started to change. And so it was really interesting. I remember going to my. Um, and we're going to meet the midwifery team, special twins clinic at about seven or eight weeks pregnant. And then they, they were saying to me, you are going to have the gold standard pregnancy care. You're never going to experience anything like this because you're having twins. So you're gonna have to all the time and be this person, that person, all these extra things do. Dah, dah, dah, dah. And obviously everything changed and I barely saw anyone that wasn't allowed to come and there wasn't, you know, they did do what they really needed to, of course, all the care go. But certainly that I couldn't go to any, they had all these twin groups where you go and you learn about twins and how to feed twins, and none of that was available. Um, and like you said, at a time, which. I mean, for me, this was still challenging because it was twins at first, at first pregnancy, which is a really scary, exciting, scary time. And the support just wasn't able to be there. So

Georgia:

obviously, because you can compare the two, that's your difference in pregnancies? Obviously you have, you've got two boys already. What would you say was the main difference other than like appointments? Did you even. Did anyone even like even call to check in, or literally it was just kind of, you're just left to your own devices.

sharkia:

So again, it was a little bit different because. Um, with it, with it being twins had extra dance. My birthing plan, you know, what, what would the birth be like? What are the options? How can that be with twins and, and no, nothing, um, was there,

Georgia:

How did the C-section

sharkia:

happen? I mean, I'm one of those pregnant people who worries that every single, you know, twin gin and whatever. And so a few times in my pregnancy, maybe, maybe about three or four times throughout the pregnancy, I driven myself down to hospital at night time. I said, look, I just want to check in everything's okay. Because I haven't felt this baby move for a while or whatever. The thing was and so I've been there a few times, and this was just another one of those times where I, I was sitting there in bed and I thought I had started to get water retention in my legs. And I thought, I just don't feel right. And I said to my husband, I really need to just go and, and, and have them check me out. Cause I just don't feel totally a hundred percent. And I said, I'll be back soon. So I literally packed my bag and I had one little bag of crisps and next I thought, Oh, it's late at night just in case I have to wait a few hours. And I went into the, I went into the room and they did all these tests. They were like, Okay, so your baby is going to be coming early. You're going to be booked in for a C-section this week. You're not going to be leaving hospital again. You need to stay in, you've developed relationships here. Dah, dah, dah. We're going to take you to, and I was like, yeah, yeah, yeah. I hadn't gotten pack my bags. Hadn't said bye to my children. I wasn't allowed visitors, obviously. So I went from like, just leaving home to suddenly. You're now staying here. I ended up being there for a fortnight for two weeks. And, you know, with minimal visitors, they literally changed the rule. I think the day that I went in, they suddenly said, okay, visitors, one visitor is allowed to come. For two hours a day. So all of a sudden you notice that I didn't see my children. I just, I was there.

Georgia:

Oh, wow. So what, what was that like? Because I know for me as well, same kind of thing. I, I went into hospital with pains and then they're like, you're, you're one centimeter, one centimeter, and you're not going anywhere. But obviously I could have all the visitors in the mall. How was you keeping yourself positive and in good spirits? Because two hours, you know, hospitals so boring, there's not much to do. I, you know, I don't know if that the hospital, they had free wifi, my hospital didn't so you read it. I don't have much entertainment. How would you keep yourself? Like in good spirits?

sharkia:

Yeah, it was weird. Like there's memory wildfire in today's world. You're like, wait. Yeah, so I can't download a video. What am I supposed to be watching? So luckily I had taken my phone charger. That's the one thing that goes everywhere. And I had one book, so I had a book, but I didn't. Yeah. As you said, you know, you so suddenly you're really cut off and also. When I was going in during this pandemic, I wasn't even allowed to walk around the halls. You could literally stay. I was so fortunate. I was under with some anxiety issues that I've had in my previous pregnancies. I was under the mental health care team. And so to have my own space, which yeah. You know, although actually I almost thought, well, it'd be nice to have someone to talk to. I, I have my own space aside just, you know, but what I would say from the whole, you know, the pre and particularly the postnatal experience, it was one of the most isolating, you know, scary and lonely times because there's minimal stuff you're lit you're left on your own for, for long periods of time. And you know, also when there is something like when something throws gets thrown off in your pregnancy, like preeclampsia or something like that it, it, you can't help, but have, you know, certain trepidations about it that you need to think about and go over and you've got no one to talk it through with then.

Georgia:

Yeah.

sharkia:

I had to sit home, hanging out the window to be on the phone.

Georgia:

so he was in hospital for, what was it a week before you actually had your C-section and I'm guessing your, your, your husband was allowed. Just to come in, scrub up and go in into the theater

sharkia:

with you. Yeah. So, so I remember I'd been in a few weeks before the time when they then kept me in and I remember going in and they sat me in a room in, in one of the rooms with a few other beds, there was only one other woman in there. And this woman was her first. Pregnancy. She was in labor and her partner wasn't allowed to be there until she was in established labor. Yeah. Yeah. I know. I just, I really felt that because, you know, Anytime I've been in labor at eight, like you said, it's scary. And it's not like she had a team full of midwives surrounding her bed. She was just there on her own. And I tried to talk to her and she was like, Oh, you know, getting another one called another conjunction. And I was like, it's okay. You know, trying my best to yeah, but, but at the same time she was on his side. Go it, but you know, she, I wasn't a family, I wasn't pregnancy. She just wanted someone there to support. She didn't have anyone. And it was really interesting. You said at the beginning, knew certain levels of trauma. And I don't think that should be necessarily underestimated because. You know, really OVI of course there is a scale and there are, you know, women who have, they completely just, you know, feel empowered by. And that's fantastic. Of course, there's the other end of the spectrum. Women who really feel that they've had to overcome or will need to overcome some form of real birth trauma and everything in between. I mean, I looked at her and I thought. Gosh, my heart goes out to you because labor isn't easy at any stage. It might not be the most painful thing you've ever felt, but yeah. You've got, you know, it's a scary time that beginning bit of labor where you're just guessing, well, contractions, you don't know what to do. You don't know? I don't remember her saying to them, to the Midwest. I need, I need something. I need something. I need something. And they were like, Oh, she's asking for drugs. Like, Oh, tell her she has to wait until she's four centuries. Then we'll give her. And this one was like, I really needed it. And then eventually they can check her in. They're like, Oh yes, of course you are. You are four sentences. Right? Let's get you into the w and I thought, my gosh, this poor woman has been here for many hours. You know, because as,

Georgia:

as a person that had my, my other half there, when I was in hospital, before I went into labor, I had friends and family come in and go in, you know, I had food dropped off. So I had all of that. You know what I mean? I had all of that and still. You know, experience a lot of trauma and shock. just felt so isolated on my own, where after I had given birth to my daughters at 27 weeks. So the thought, like I tried to even to think about how traumatic it must, it must be a must have been for some mothers who had to just, you know, go through it on their own. It's just, Oh my God, it's the saddest thing because. as you said, it can be tough on different levels, but you just want support there. Like that. That's all.

sharkia:

Yeah, absolutely. I'm also what I thought was so weird about it again, pre and postnatally is that we're in this intense lockdown where it was like, you didn't see anybody else, but you did see, Oh, you know, I saw my partner every day we were together and it was like, this became all family, all bubble became my support network. I didn't see anybody else. And that was my support. And then boom, they take it away from you. You know, the whole support network, the only support network you've had for the last nine months is gone. And then they're like, what are you going to do it with a team of medical professionals who are all sterilized and don't know you. And that's the one support network you've had over this whole strange time is gone, which is this really weird time to choose to take that from a woman. So, how did

Georgia:

you feel about the, having a C-section? Was it just like, okay, I've got precancer, this is the best thing to, do you feel any feelings towards it? Because I know we've met my, in my situation with when I was pregnant, I was just like, whatever's best of course I'd prefer natural, but in fact, obviously social I'll have to have a C-section. It just is what it

sharkia:

In terms of a it was weird. I had two parts of my brain. I had the expert part of my brain, where I worked with pre and postnatal women all the time and I've trained, um, and section mothers a lot. And that part of my brain, the first thing I thought over there was. Wow, this is going to be a real interesting learning cup because everything that I put into practice that I, that I teach women, I'm going to get that experience. And then there was like the reality, real Shakira part of my brain that was really quite overwhelmed again. But what I find weird, maybe it was just my experience with this area is that they tell you you going to have a cesarean. But they didn't really tell you anything else that, you know, they don't talk you through, right. Here's a diagram of your body. And you know, we're going to make one decision here and then and I'm the type of person, not everyone is like that, but I would like to understand the process as it's happening and why and why it's happening. And you're not really given that. And, you know, during, during a scenario, It was, he says, areas are fantastic. They save lives the whole time I needed one. It was the best decision for me and my babies. And I'm so, so incredibly grateful that that is an option that we have, but it's also, it's this, it's this weird process of, um, literally your intimate space at your internal organ. You know, you can't get more private and personal than that. But it's, it's a very routine procedure for them. So, you know, they're like, Oh, and they're sort of like tugging you around and push, but I'm like, Oh, and I thought, well, hang on a minute. Like, this is my ride space. And there's something about sort of like this informed consent, you know, where actually I want you to say right Shakira, we're going to be, what we're going to be doing is, is this, is this okay with you for your start? Yes, it is. Okay, great. Alright, now we're going to be moving into this space. Is this okay? Of course in an emergency or a crash is there and that's not always possible, but I, I really felt that that was missing. And I felt an element, a small element of trauma from that, because it was so invasive. I know, I felt almost left out of the process. I think I was really spoiled the first time, because when my first it was the picture perfect process. Cause I went, I got, went into labor in the night. We went to see the midwife. She said, Oh yeah, that's right. Go down to hospital. Right. had all our bags, everything ready? Got got our own room that time. Really fantastic. And then then the, the woman who was, I want you to have material and the doctor came in and said, okay, let me talk you through the process. So here's a little drawing of fester. Talk to us. Everything was just lovely, calm, slow, perfectly tight. And then, you know, too, but to go from that, to then this experience where they were like, you're going to have the gold standard experience. And then they were like, right. We all staying in. You're not going anywhere. No one really communicates. You're having a scenario in a week. Boom in the room half an hour, you go from pregnant, not pregnant, both like that. Yeah. And it's huge. It's a huge thing. Yeah. I was you know, that, that process between pregnant not pregnant as well is really it was really interesting and something I hadn't necessarily considered before I had this as Erin is the fact that although I can rationally understand. Okay. I'm in an operating theater. They're going to for, I'm going to see my babies and I'll be a mum I can rush in together, your emotions and, and, you know, physically. My body was not prepared to become a mother. So it was like this real sudden thing where my body almost went into shock because it was like I've been pregnant, I'm carrying on being pregnant. And then bam, it was like CDs. Yeah. Babies are out. And my body's like, Whoa, okay, I'm not pregnant anymore. So your body's going through this massive shift that it wasn't necessarily prepared for. And although I could rationally get that, my body was not with me. And then my emotions. Well, not with my body because my emotions were like, I had this massive relation of it. Here's my babies. And that's so fantastic. I've got to meet them and they're here. But then emotionally I felt so disconnected to my physical being. It was, it threw me for a bit of a loop because I couldn't couldn't couldn't match the two, you know, it sounds difficult to explain, but it was, I had not considered that element of it. I think I had this conversation yesterday with someone where I was saying like, you know, we have all these things that, that, you know, are this new age thing, technology. And this amount of is one of those rare moments where you actually feel the fact that we are animals. We forget about that. We like get dressed in our clothes and, but actually we're animals like lions and tigers. We are animals. And birth is one of those moments where you add, in fact, That, that thing of being a mum, that thing really overpowering thing for me, it was, yes. I love my children, but like really overpowering thing was that animal like. What, you know, these are your babies and you're just like, okay, now I've got like, I'm grounded, I've got roots, you know? And that's just a really interesting thing.

Georgia:

So obviously after you had your service area, what the boys? Oh no, you've got all, you got a boy and a girl. How are they? Health wise? They were just, they were a bit early. How many weeks?

sharkia:

Barely barely two days. I was, I was 36 weeks. That's great. That's great. But they were pretty much there, but my daughter was really small. She always had been really small. and she was tiny. And I think the cutter point, I think, forgive me if I get this wrong is at 1.8 kilos, they take them to neonatal and she was 1.9. So she was just able to stay, but she was tiny, you know, really small and the postnatal experience when, if I was to. Look at a point in my experience where I feel I really experienced a form of trauma, like a traumatic experience. It would have been postnatally because I already, as I said, had this real disconnect to my body, they took me and the babies to the room. My husband was not allowed to stay. And how does this Eric's I never had before I couldn't walk properly. I, you know, it always starts and the care, the care was not that they would really stretch. Thin, obviously with the pandemic going on. And I was, uh, they were giving me morphine for the pain for the first 36 hours as I was like, hi, as a client of morphine and then left alone with two babies. And it was, you know, and I could barely move around in that your period and, um, I remember them trying to get me to walk, you know, within 12 hours, they tried to get you on your feet walking. And I just remember just crying my eyes out. I was like, no, I'm not ready. I'm not ready. Now you have to get up. You have to walk, you have to walls. Okay. But I was really, really struggling. And so I'd had the twins and I was trying to breastfeed them. And I remember I had one of them and I rang the buzzer to ask them the midwives. Can you pass me the other baby? And took her a while to come. Then she came and I said, can you pass me the baby? And she said, are you even trying. And I was crying. And, um, then she was like, you know, we have mothers who just bounced back to dah, dah, dah, dah, and you should know. And I was like, Oh my gosh. And so I got scared to ring the buzzer because, and then I remember him bringing the buzzer and another time and hearing them outside and they went, Oh, is it her again? Yeah, it was her again. And I thought, Oh gosh, I'll go scared to ring the buzzer. And it all resulted in me, standing in the bathroom that evening. I. I was trying to change my underwear. You know, these big, massive underwear you wear after pregnancy, because you've got all that postnatal bleeding. And I was trying to, trying to change my underwear, but I couldn't bend down to put the underwear on and I couldn't lift my knee either to put the underwear on. So I was just stood there, crying in the bathroom because I was too scared to ring the bell, to tell someone, can you help me get dressed? And I, and I, you know, it felt humiliating, um, you know,

Georgia:

needed help.

sharkia:

Yeah, but, but no one was coming. It's not like someone said, look, you're a hero. You've done this amazing thing. Of course, I helped you put your underwear on. You've done this amazing thing. You know, I felt like, Oh my gosh, I'm so stupid. I can't even, and it was really, really, really horrible, horrible feeling. Um, and. Not everyone experiences that, of course I'm not, I don't want to frighten women. And the next day I had a fantastic midwife who was there the next day. And she said, she basically gave me a pep talk. She was like, you have to fight for your rights. You don't have to fight for what you, what you need, if that's what you need, you absolutely wearing that belt doesn't matter. And you get the help you need. And I think they then spoke with the people who had, who treated me that way. But It was, it was, it was again, this weird thing. So I thought push that was, that is who I am. You know, I'm a strong person. I'll fight for what I needed, but in that moment, I just felt so overwhelmed by the process. And, and then, you know that on top that it was just a very strange experience.

Georgia:

So how long was he in hospital for you was allowed to go

sharkia:

home? So we were there for a week, but we really had to fight to go home. And it was, it was all around the fact that my daughter was small, but she had, you know, they test them at the beginning. They test them like every half an hour or so day and night. And then they go to less tests and less than she was every time she was hitting every month, blah, blah, blah. And it was all about her putting on weight and being fed. And in the end, Yeah, we were pushing, pushing, pushing, pushing, pushing, and they said, look, you know, we have to get, um, uh, you know, a senior pediatrician to come into the dah, dah, dah. And so someone eventually came in and I said to them, look, you know, this whole week I've been here. She's, she's hitting everything. Single thing she needs to hit. If the whole is the goal of everything is to get her. Yeah, it's it's for my daughter to be putting on as much weight as possible. The best thing in my opinion is for me to go home because I've got more support at home. I had, you know, we were in a bubble at that point when my mum, so my mum and my husband were at home sleeping all night while I was in hospital with two babies. Yeah. I was like, you know,

Georgia:

I did breastfeed. You did all of that. That's

sharkia:

mental. Yeah. I was thinking I can go home and my husband, will you sit me on the couch? And my husband can bring me some food while I'm sitting there. And my focus is on breastfeeding. I'm really fortunate with the support that I have. And I thought this is just madness. I'm here and not utilizing this fantastic support network is just waiting. And so in the end, the, um, what I think. It's very easy for me to say, cause I'm not the experts in, in, in a medical field. So I do completely understand, they have to make sure that they have ticked every box, but it is a little bit. Tick boxy where they, you know, and this had pediatrician came along and he, he looked at my daughter and said, do you know what we have to tickle this things? But actually the best thing to do is look at the baby in front of you and this baby. She is thriving. She is happy. The best thing for you to do as a family is to go home so that you're comfortable and your focus can be about, you know, raising your children. And so eventually there was someone like that and that. Yeah, that was a game changer.

Georgia:

And then when you got home and then you got back to your boys and how was that adjustment for you?

sharkia:

Yeah, it was great. I mean, initially ma initially I think it was a little bit overdramatic, but slightly dramatic person. And literally I stepped out the hospital, the light in the sky trees, like in a cave for a year. I was literally like, I can see all the way over there. I was, I was a really extra about it, but, um, I genuinely felt like, wow, I've actually out in like a space. Um, and I got home and there's this amazing moment for anybody who's had you know, is having like a subsequent pregnancy. There's this amazing moment of the siblings meeting the baby. I mean, I love it. It's so great. And of course it's great to see my children and just to be home was fantastic. And, and to be honest, I feel like that's where my recovery really started was when I got home. But again, really fortunate, you know, it was summertime the sun shining and that

Georgia:

always makes everything better,

sharkia:

everything better, you know? I, I would also say that I've been on a massive journey in terms of anxiety. I said at the beginning and those first two pregnancies, although they were Singleton pregnancies, vaginal, you know relatively uncomplicated vaginal deliveries. And, you know, I was, I was home the next day and all this stuff, so my anxiety was so high. And so I have had some really tricky postnatal experiences. Yeah. It's one of all the things the pandemic has brought us and there's been some real lows for many, many people. One of the real blessings in our family unit was that my husband was able to be home from work. And so we had this like really great first few months where we were in a bar and it was just us in our little bubble raising these two new babies, you know? So there was then a really beautiful period of recovery that is not to say there were no struggles because my gosh. Breastfeeding twins is just, and I've got my own issues with breastfeeding anyway, but breastfeeding twins and expressing on top is, might as well have triplets. And then you've got, I had a toddler. I had a six-year-old and so school was closed. So there was certainly challenges, but there was also a really beautiful period of time.

Georgia:

So is there any, like tips, suggestions, advice you would give to anybody kind of. Who's pregnant just about to give birth kind of going to go step into the hospital and go into that world. yeah. Any advice that you'll have for anyone during this pandemic?

sharkia:

I think my gosh, what, what helps me in those times? Oh, it's always tricky to just talk about social media, because there are some real pros and cons as with everything, but it was a real pro for me actually, because the only thing that did work on my phone was Instagram. And I felt almost like I have, I do feel a little bit like I've got a secondary little family or certainly like a close. Frightened group on there, women who have not even necessarily met, but women who share experiences and, you know, I'm, so I'm so grateful that I've connected with a really great group of women on social media, like yourself, who, you know, they're mothers, they understand that I've got a level of support from that in a way. But of course, you've got to be careful because I'm not going to go and tell someone, make Instagram, you wear everything. That certainly wouldn't be my advice. I love logging off as well. I think for me, It was the small things. So I, when I was in hospital on my own before the delivery and I didn't have much to do, I thought, okay, do you know what I'm going to use this as an opportunity to work on some self-care and that meant mentally as well, practice some mindfulness. I did some meditations. I worked on some breath work, you know, and just really try to. Relax really tried to find a way to relax, which in, in an environment that isn't your own and there's BBB in the hallway is easiest. But almost I tried to use that as a benefit and B as a positive and be like, right, I'm going to work even harder to learn about positive mindsets and about breathing and about relaxation in this environment. This is, this is my test. This is how I'm going to learn, you know, so I did that. and then Journaling. I did a lot of that as well. When my husband was allowed to come and visit for those two hours, he brought me a note, pad and pen, and I would write, you know, anything from poetry to just a stream of conscious thought of what I was thinking. Or I would write a little letter to the twins, or I would just keep diary today. I'm doing this to the da, you know, however you want to use it. But for me, that became a real outlet as well. Just gave me something creative to do. And then Yeah, things like that. And then I think postnatally. You're pretty busy. Cause you've got your new baby and you had a

Georgia:

C-section. So how, w how did that, how did you cope with that as well? And any tips for people going back home with a C-section and you've got your babies. You've got toddlers. Just,

sharkia:

yeah. Yeah. The gems. Yeah, my God. Okay. So in terms of the physical, the physical recovery with the severity of section, one of the things I'm often asked as a, as a professional is whether or not women who've had a cesarean still need to do their pelvic floor exercises cause they didn't push a baby out. But absolutely they still do because you still carried that baby on your pelvic floor muscles for such a long time. So it's really important that you do still work on your pelvic floor exercises, but I think it's important also to understand. That we shouldn't just be strengthening and tightening. Our pelvic floor is super important, particularly postnatally to do that, but some women can overtrain their pelvic floor. And so that element of taking a deep breath and relaxing those pelvic floor muscles in between also author so interesting that I was learn about this since having my twins, how deep. Deep breath work. If we breathe correctly and we allow our diaphragm to descend, when we breathe, then it really can assist with scar tissue recovery. So, yeah. So something like a scenario or any abdominal surgery. Okay. Hysterectomy or something. when you take that deep breath in and the diaphragm descends, it almost massages the organs beneath and helps to keep that scar tissue mobile. So it's really important that, that we do do that as part as our recovery part of our recovery and then stress. So there's been studies to research is still on undergoing. So I can't, you know, it's not like this is definite yet. Yeah, it is pretty definite, but yeah, it's certainly not written in stone. but the, the impact that stress can have on scar tissue, because there's research to suggest that that's high levels of stress can trigger scar tissue regrowth. So you, you know, having that scar tissues. Yeah. And so we want to make sure that we that we try to relax as much as, as possible.

Georgia:

Okay, so thank you. I think that's a great way to round it up and. Just share your Instagram that people know you're, you know, professional personal trainer. So just tell everyone where to find you. You did great videos of exercise, holding them babies

sharkia:

interest because I'm eating as well. Yeah. So I'm, I'm on Instagram, a secure adult, ACA Boosie. I, my campaign is called strong, like mum. That's kind of my message. And it's about sort of how to balance it is primarily about pre and postnatal wellness, which is my expertise. I work in pre and postnatal recovery and rehabilitation, but I'm so passionate about that connection between the physical body and the mind and how they work together. So my whole sort of aim is to. Assist women in feeling empowered and, you know, and just sort of showing that you can be just as passionate, strong, sexy, you know, successful, confident, and as a mother, as you were before you were a mother and that yeah. Helping to show that the next generation that you can, you can be what you want. Don't allow anybody to label you as someone's idea of mum. There's not necessarily your idea of mum and just, you know just sharing that message and connecting with other like-minded women. So Shakira, I could be still on Instagram or my website is strong, like mom.com. Okay. Thank you

Georgia:

so much. That's absolutely amazing.

sharkia:

I'm gonna bite you.

Georgia:

Thanks for this event. Thanks for listening to the OSHA twins podcast. You can find me Georgia Martel at OSHA twins on Facebook and Instagram. And my website is OSHA twins.com. I'll be posting new episodes once every two weeks. And in the meantime, you can like comment and subscribe.

About the author

Georgia is a mother who has decided to live out loud after motherhood took the wind out of her! From finding out she was going to be a mother of twins, then them being born at 27 weeks (two and a half months early), it was a rollercoaster but sharing the whole experience on platforms such as Make Motherhood Diverse has reminded her that she wasn’t alone despite not feeling included in the mainstream vision of motherhood.
Georgia regularly shares the realities of being a mother of twins on her Instagram page while still craving her own piece of the world. It’s a mixture of meltdowns and giggles and Black British Motherhood in all its glory.
Georgia has a background in beauty as a qualified make-up artist and eyelash technician. She ran a beauty business providing pamper treatments for private and corporate clients, and has also worked on a multitude of events including influencers book launches for Zoella and Tanya Burr, and brands such as Wilko and Pixi beauty. Despite her love for beauty, she is fully aware of the lack of diversity and poorly executed campaigns when brands want to appear diverse.

Georgia is a confident communicator and loves to chat about all things motherhood, womanhood and diversity (or the lack thereof) in the media and beauty world, all from a Black British Londoner perspective.

Feel free to contact Georgia via the contact page.

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